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from across the Group.

I moved to Queensland from our Sydney office some 5 years ago and back then the startup eco-system was almost non-existent. In order to connect the community somewhat, I started chapters of Silicon Beach on the Gold Coast & Brisbane at the end of 2011, which has a combined community of around 2,700 members.

Last week, Frog Valley presented a Venture Capital-focused event at CAPCO with a panel of experts, looking to the year ahead. The panel comprised of Jeff Tijssen - Head of Fintech and Digital Partnerships at Capco; Gary Stewart -Director of Wayra UK; Cornel Chiriac - Managing Partner of London Venture Factory; and Fernando Valda - Investment Director at Nord Engine Capital. Below are the biggest takeaways from the evening.

In my first piece I spoke about my introduction to recruiting and my role as a sourcer. I’ve experienced some new and exciting things since then and wanted to give you all a quick update. Now, as a follow-up from 'Life of a Sourcer, Part 1', I was given the opportunity to act as the interim recruiter while my colleague was away on her honeymoon (congrats AS!). This was for a client who I was actually sourcing for back when our contract first started, so luckily I already had a relationship with the team. I was excited to switch it up from my usual task of sourcing and gain some more experience working the full cycle. I’ve shadowed the team numerous times before so I felt pretty comfortable taking it on, but this time it would be a little different knowing I was on my own. I was brought in to keep the process running smoothly, and even though I’d only be there a short amount of time, I wanted to get as many candidates as possible through the funnel. Luckily my colleague (who was the consultant beforehand) made the transition pretty seamless, leaving me in a good spot to do so.

Roller coasters for “fun”? No, thank you. For those of you who know me, I am not one to rush into line for a roller coaster. Don’t get me wrong, rides (think Indiana Jones at Disneyland) are a blast, roller coasters (think Tower of Terror at California Adventure), not so much. The feeling of having your life in the hands of some 16-year-old kid on summer vacation and having complete faith in some metal and bolts holding the entire structure together is unsettling. Roller coaster rides are similar to the ups and downs that we recruiters are all too familiar with in many ways. We have all dealt with the anticipation of finding the perfect candidate and working with them throughout the entire process, and dealing with the anticipation to help them over the finish line.

I’m stereotyping here, but many engineers (especially young, inexperienced ones working at startups) see management as unnecessary overhead. They don’t see the value in having an engineering leader, and may or may-not respect non-technical contributions to the team. This tends to change once they work with a great leader, or have worked through a couple of poorly-managed failures.