News, insight and events
from across the Group.

Shaken, not Sourced

Single_94f788933e00b725

Regardless of our age, we’ve all been exposed to a James Bond. Whether it was Daniel Craig, Sean Connery or my personal favorite Pierce Brosnan (yes there are plenty of others, but these are my top 3) we all know they each carry a certain swagger, as well as an ability to fully immerse themselves in the character they're playing in their respective mission (IF they chose to accept it!).

In my first piece I spoke about my introduction to recruiting and my role as a sourcer. I’ve experienced some new and exciting things since then and wanted to give you all a quick update. Now, as a follow-up from 'Life of a Sourcer, Part 1', I was given the opportunity to act as the interim recruiter while my colleague was away on her honeymoon (congrats AS!). This was for a client who I was actually sourcing for back when our contract first started, so luckily I already had a relationship with the team. I was excited to switch it up from my usual task of sourcing and gain some more experience working the full cycle. I’ve shadowed the team numerous times before so I felt pretty comfortable taking it on, but this time it would be a little different knowing I was on my own. I was brought in to keep the process running smoothly, and even though I’d only be there a short amount of time, I wanted to get as many candidates as possible through the funnel. Luckily my colleague (who was the consultant beforehand) made the transition pretty seamless, leaving me in a good spot to do so.

The Recruiting Tackle Box

Single_7da861162bf79737

I like to go fishing. Yes, I enjoy going outside and catching fish with a rod and reel. "I thought this was a blog about recruiting," you are probably now asking yourself. Hold on, we will get there. The truth is, I spend more of my time fishing than I do catching. The same way I spend more of my time sourcing than I do hiring. That is the reality of it. Any angler will tell you that fishing is not easy (an honest angler will, at least). Believe it or not, fishing is an interesting hobby. It is a hobby that will take you places, show you things and above all teach you things. I have and continue to learn many of life’s lesson from my time spent fishing, and over the years it has become one of my passions.

One of my favorite lines from one of my favorite bands (The Samples) is stuck in my head as I reflect on a new executive search that my team and I are about to kick off. The search discovery meetings are beginning tomorrow morning and I didn't get my usual 5 hours of sleep because I was pumped up and ready to begin the hunting process. We will be seeking another purple squirrel,* a security executive from a great company in the Valley or beyond. It is what consumes me and drives me. We look for every avenue to locate and build relationships with the very best and most rare executive technical talent. The excitement is tethered by other feelings of concern about how prepared the client will be and how the candidates will perceive the search. I know that the client is closing in on their calibrating but not there and the candidate pool is already looking far ahead in their career progression while contemplating their objections before we make first contact. This excitement and conflict is normal; I have had these feelings many times before. After all, it is the job that I love. But as I mature (depending on who you ask) and begin reflecting on life's lessons in this business I find myself often asking; “are we really progressing and learning from past lessons and mistakes, or are we just repeating the same themes and forgetting just enough to make things sound new and fresh?". Are we a 'traveling mass with a memory loss'? What does history say about that?

I am by no means an expert on approaching social events perfectly. I do, however, have some beliefs based off experiences I’ve had. My main goal for you (the reader) is to remember to be confident, positive and memorable. When you go to a networking event, a party that you know very few people at or even a new job, I would highly recommend going in with these seven things:

I am very fortunate and excited to be on a remote working journey where I live in 12 different cities across Southeast Asia, Europe, Central America and South America over the next year. There are 75 of us “remotes” traveling together from all different parts of the world, with all kinds of employment, on a program called Remote Year. The first stop was Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, which was the perfect place to begin my journey. It is a big city with many cool cafes, co-working spaces, and provided an excellent introduction to different Asian cultures and cuisines.

Finding a new job can be a nerve-wracking and lengthy process. There is dating and swooning happening from both sides of the table. Candidates do their best to make a great impression and showcase their skills and expertise. Companies want candidates to believe that their company is the best place on earth to work (maybe it is), and that they have created a happy and humble environment. There is an underlying fear of rejection exhibited from candidates and companies alike. We all know how it feels to build your hopes up so high, only to have them come crashing down right in front of you. The decision to leave your old job, enter into the dating world, and hopefully settle down, doesn’t have to be a scary one.

I recently graduated from a Product Management program here in San Francisco. For those who are unfamiliar with what a product manager does, the short answer is that they do many things. PMs wear multiple hats at once: they are a liaison between internal and external stakeholders to bring a product vision to life, they constantly collect feedback from customers to ensure that the product reflects market demand, as well as conduct research their competition to become an expert in their industry. But perhaps most importantly, a product manager must take full ownership of the success of a product. They must own whether consumers love or hate a product, and are in charge of making any necessary changes to guarantee that buyers have a good enough experience to become repeat customers. In short, product management is a strategic, process-oriented and user-centered way of working.

Roller coasters for “fun”? No, thank you. For those of you who know me, I am not one to rush into line for a roller coaster. Don’t get me wrong, rides (think Indiana Jones at Disneyland) are a blast, roller coasters (think Tower of Terror at California Adventure), not so much. The feeling of having your life in the hands of some 16-year-old kid on summer vacation and having complete faith in some metal and bolts holding the entire structure together is unsettling. Roller coaster rides are similar to the ups and downs that we recruiters are all too familiar with in many ways. We have all dealt with the anticipation of finding the perfect candidate and working with them throughout the entire process, and dealing with the anticipation to help them over the finish line.